Peacepink

Worldwide Campaign to stop the Abuse and Torture of Mind Control/DEWs

Satellite Surveillance including:

GPS Tracking

See through Wall

Reading your mind with implants

Reading your mind without an implants

 

Intrusive Brain Reading Surveillance Technology: Hacking the Mind

by Carole Smith

“Carole Smith describes claims that neuroscientists are developing brain scans that can read people’s intentions in the absence of serious discussions about the ethical issues this raises, despite the fact that the research has been backed by government in the UK and US.”
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“We need a program of psychosurgery for political control of our society. The purpose is physical control of the mind. Everyone who deviates from the given norm can be surgically mutilated.

The individual may think that the most important reality is his own existence, but this is only his personal point of view. This lacks historical perspective. Man does not have the right to develop his own mind. This kind of liberal orientation has great appeal. We must electronically control the brain. Someday armies and generals will be controlled by electric stimulation of the brain.

Dr José Delgado.Director of Neuropsychiatry, Yale University Medical School Congressional Record, No. 26, Vol. 118 February 24, 1974.

 

The Guardian newspaper, that defender of truth in the United Kingdom, published an article by the Science Correspondent, Ian Sample, on 9 February 2007 entitled:

‘The Brain Scan that can read people’s intentions’, with the sub-heading: ‘Call for ethical debate over possible use of new technology in interrogation”.

“Using the scanner, we could look around the brain for this information and read out something that from the outside there's no way you could possibly tell is in there. It's like shining a torch around, looking for writing on a wall”, the scientists were reported as saying.

 

At the same time, London’s Science Museum was holding an exhibition entitled ‘Neurobotics: The Future of Thinking’. This venue had been chosen for the launch in October 2006 of the news that human thoughts could be read using a scanner. Dr Geraint Rees’ smiling face could be seen in a photograph at the Neurobotics website[1], under the heading “The Mind Reader”. Dr Rees is one of the scientists who have apparently cracked the problem which has preoccupied philosophers and scientists since before Plato: they had made entry into the conscious mind. Such a reversal of human historical evolution, announced in such a pedestrian fashion, makes one wonder what factors have been in play, and what omissions made, in getting together this show, at once banal and extraordinary. The announcement arrives as if out of a vacuum. The neuroscientist - modern-style hunter-gatherer of information and darling of the “Need to Know” policies of modern government - does little to explain how he achieved this goal of entering the conscious mind, nor does he put his work into any historical context. Instead, we are asked in the Science Museum’s programme notes:

How would you feel if someone could read your innermost thoughts? Geraint Rees of UCL says he can. By using brain-imaging technology he's beginning to decode thought and explore the difference between the conscious and unconscious mind. But how far will it go? And shouldn’t your thoughts remain your personal business?

If Dr Rees has decoded the mind sufficiently for such an announcement to be made in an exhibition devoted to it, presumably somewhere is the mind which has been, and is continuing to be, decoded. He is not merely continuing his experiments using functional magnetic resolution scanning (fMRI) in the way neuroscientists have been observing their subjects under scanning devices for years, asking them to explain what they feel or think while the scientists watch to see which area lights up, and what the cerebral flow in the brain indicates for various brain areas. Dr Rees is decoding the mind in terms of conscious and unconscious processes. For that, one must have accessed consciousness itself. Whose consciousness? Where is the owner of that consciousness – and unconsciousness? How did he/she feel? Why not ask them to tell us how it feels, instead of asking us.

 

The Neurobotics Exhibition was clearly set up to make these exciting new discoveries an occasion for family fun, and there were lots of games for visitors to play. One gets the distinct impression that we are being softened up for the introduction of radical new technology which will, perhaps, make the mind a communal pool rather than an individual possession. Information technology seeks to connect us all to each other in as many ways as possible, but also, presumably, to those vast data banks which allow government control not only to access all information about our lives, but now also to our thoughts, even to our unconscious processing. Does anyone care?

One of the most popular exhibits was the ‘Mindball’ game, which required two players to go literally head-to-head in a battle for brainpower, and used ‘brainpower’ alone. Strapped up with headbands which pick up brain waves, the game uses neurofeedback, but the person who is calm and relaxed wins the game. One received the impression that this calmness was the spirit that the organisers wished to reinforce, to deflect any undue public panic that might arise from the news that private thoughts could now be read with a scanner.[2] The ingress into the mind as a private place was primarily an event to be enjoyed with the family on an afternoon out:

Imagine being able to control a computer with only the power of your mind. Or read people’s thoughts and know if they’re lying. And what if a magnetic shock to the brain could make you more creative…but should we be able to engineer our minds?

Think your thoughts are private? Ever told a lie and been caught red-handed? Using brain-scanning technology, scientists are beginning to probe our minds and tell if we’re lying. Other scientists are decoding our desires and exploring the difference between our conscious and unconscious mind. But can you really trust the technology?

Other searching questions are raised in the program notes, and more games:

Find out if you’ve got what it takes to be a modern-day spy in this new interactive family exhibition. After being recruited as a trainee spy, explore the skills and abilities required by real agents and use some of the latest technologies that help spies gather and analyse information. Later go on and discover what it’s like to be spied upon. Uncover a secret store of prototype gadgets that give you a glimpse into the future of spy technologies and finally use everything you’ve learnt to escape before qualifying as a fully-fledged agent!

There were also demonstrations of grateful paraplegics and quadriplegics showing how the gods of science have so unselfishly liberated them from their prisons: this was the serious Nobel Prize side of the show. But there was no-one representing Her Majesty’s government to demonstrate how these very same devices[3] can be used quite freely, and with relative ease, in our wireless age[4], to conduct experiments on free-ranging civilians tracked anywhere in the world, and using an infinitely extendable form of electrode which doesn’t require visible contact with the scalp at all. Electrodes, like electricity, can also take an invisible form – an electrode is a terminal of an electric source through which electrical energy or current may flow in or out. The brain itself is an electrical circuit. Every brain has its own unique resonating frequency. The brain is an infinitely more sensitive receiver and transmitter than the computer, and even in the wireless age, the comprehension of how wireless networks operate appears not to extend to the workings of the brain. The monotonous demonstration of scalps with electrodes attached to them, in order to demonstrate the contained conduction of electrical charges, is a scientific fatuity, in so far as it is intended to demonstrate comprehensively the capability of conveying charges to the brain, or for that matter, to any nerve in the body, as a form of invisible torture.

 

As Neurobotics claims: ‘Your brain is amazing’, but the power and control over brains and nervous systems achieved by targeting brain frequencies with radiowaves must have been secretly amazing government scientists for many years. The problem that now arises, at the point of readiness when so much has been achieved, is how to put the technology into action in such a way, as it will be acceptable in the public domain. This requires getting it through wider government and legal bodies, and for that, it must be seen to spring from the unbiased scientific investigations into the workings of the brain, in the best tradition of the leading universities. It is given over to Dr Rees and his colleague, Professor Haynes, endowed with the disclosure for weightier Guardian readers, to carry the torch for the government. Those involved may also have noted the need to show the neuroscientist in a more responsible light, following US neuroengineer for government sponsored Lockheed Martin, John Norseen’s, ingenuous comment, in 2000, about his belief about the consequences of his work in fMRI:

‘If this research pans out’, said Norseen, ‘you can begin to manipulate what someone is thinking even before they know it.’ And added: “The ethics don’t concern me, but they should concern someone else.”

While the neuroscientists report their discovery (without even so much as the specific frequency of the light employed by this scanner/torch), issuing ethical warnings while incongruously continuing with their mind-blowing work, the government which sponsors them, remains absolutely mute. The present probing of people’s intentions, minds, background thoughts, hopes and emotions[5] is being expanded into the more complex and subtle aspects of thinking and feeling. We have, however, next to no technical information about their methods. The description of ‘shining a torch around the brain’ is as absurd a report as one could read of a scientific endeavour, especially one that carries such enormous implications for the future of mankind. What is this announcement, with its technical obfuscation, preparing us for?

 

Writing in Wired[6] contributing editor Steve Silberman points out that the lie-detection capability of fMRI is ‘poised to transform the security system, the judicial system, and our fundamental notions of privacy’. He quotes Cephos founder, Steven Laken, whose company plans to market the new technology for lie detection. Laken cites detainees held without charge at Guantanamo Bay as a potential example. ‘If these detainees have information we haven’t been able to extract that could prevent another 9/11, I think most Americans would agree that we should be doing whatever it takes to extract it’. Silberman also quotes Paul Root Wolpe, a senior fellow at the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, who describes the accelerated advances in fMRI as ‘ a textbook example of how something can be pushed forward by the convergence of basic science, the government directing research through funding, and special interests who desire a particular technology’. Are we to believe that with the implied capability to scan jurors’ brains, the judiciary, the accused and the defendant alike, influencing[7] one at the expense of the other, that the legal implications alone of mind-accessing scanners on university campuses, would not rouse the Minister for Justice from his bench to say a few words about these potential mind weapons?

So what of the ethical debate called for by the busy scientists and the Guardian’s science reporter?[8] Can this technology- more powerful in subverting thought itself than anything in prior history – really be confined to deciding whether the ubiquitously invoked terrorist has had the serious intention of blowing up the train, or whether it was perhaps a foolish prank to make a bomb out of chapatti flour? We can assume that the government would certainly not give the go-ahead to the Science Museum Exhibition, linked to Imperial College, a major government-sponsored institution in laser-physics, if it was detrimental to surveillance programs. It is salutary to bear in mind that government intelligence research is at least ten years ahead of any public disclosure. It is implicit from history that whatever affords the undetectable entry by the gatekeepers of society into the brain and mind, will not only be sanctioned, but funded and employed by the State, more specifically by trained operatives in the security forces, given powers over defenceless citizens, and unaccountable to them.[9]

The actual technology which is now said to be honing the technique ‘to distinguish between passing thoughts and genuine intentions’ is described by Professor John-Dylan Haynes in the Guardian in the most disarmingly untechnical language which must surely not have been intended to enlighten.

The Guardian piece ran as follows:

A team of world-leading neuroscientists has developed a powerful technique that allows them to look deep inside a person’s brain and read their intentions before they act.

The research breaks controversial new ground in scientists’ ability to probe people’s minds and eavesdrop on their thoughts, and raises serious ethical issues over how brain-reading technology may be used in the future.

‘Using the scanner, we could look around the brain for this information and read out something that from the outside there's no way you could possibly tell is in there. It's like shining a torch around, looking for writing on a wall,’ said John-Dylan Haynes at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Germany, who led the study with colleagues at University College London and Oxford University.

 

We know therefore that they are using light, but fMRI has been used for many years to attempt the unravelling of neuronal activity, and while there have been many efforts to record conscious and unconscious processes, with particular emphasis on the visual cortex, there has been no progress into consciousness itself. We can be sure that we are not being told the real story.

Just as rats and chimpanzees have been used to demonstrate findings from remote experiments on humans, electrode implants used on cockroaches to remotely control them, lasers used to steer fruit-flies[10] [11], and worms engineered so that their nerves and muscles can be controlled with pinpricks of light[12], the information and techniques that have been ruthlessly forged using opportunistic onslaughts on defenceless humans as guinea pigs - used for myriad purposes from creating 3D haptic gloves in computer games to creating artificial intelligence to send visual processing into outer space - require appropriate replication for peer group approval and to meet ethical demands for scientific and public probity.

The use of light to peer into the brain is almost certainly that of terahertz, which occurs in the wavelengths which lie between 30mm and 1mm of the electromagnetic spectrum. Terahertz has the ability to penetrate deep into organic materials, without (it is said) the damage associated with ionising radiation such as x-rays. It can distinguish between materials with varying water content – for example fat versus lean meat. These properties lend themselves to applications in process and quality control as well as biomedical imaging. Terahertz can penetrate bricks, and also human skulls. Other applications can be learnt from the major developer of terahertz in the UK, Teraview, which is in Cambridge, and partially owned by Toshiba.

 

Efforts to alert human rights’ groups about the loss of the mind as a place to call your own, have met with little discernible reaction, in spite of reports about over decades of the dangers of remote manipulation using technology to access the mind[13], Dr Nick Begich’s book, Controlling the human mind[14], being an important recent contribution. A different approach did in fact, elicit a response. When informed of the use of terahertz at Heathrow and Luton airports in the UK to scan passengers, the news that passengers would be revealed naked by a machine which looked directly through their clothes produced a small, but highly indignant, article in the spring 2007 edition of the leading human rights organisation, Liberty.[15] If the reading of the mind met with no protest, seeing through one’s clothes certainly did. It seems humans’ assumption of the mind as a private place has been so secured by evolution that it will take a sustained battle to convince the public that, through events of which we are not yet fully informed, such former innocence has been lost.

Trained light, targeted atomic spectroscopy, the use of powerful magnets to absorb moisture from human tissues, the transfer of radiative energy – these have replaced the microwave harassment which was used to transmit auditory messages directly into the hearing.[16] With the discovery of light to disentangle thousands of neurons and encode signals from the complex circuitry of the brain, present programs will not even present the symptoms which simulated schizoid states. Medically, even if terahertz does not ionise, we do not yet know how the sustained application of intense light will affect the delicate workings of the brain and how cells might be damaged, dehydrated, stretched, obliterated.

 

This year, 2007, has also brought the news that terahertz lasers small enough to incorporate into portable devices had been developed.[17]

Sandia National Laboratories in the US in collaboration with MIT have produced a transmitter-receiver (transceiver) that enables a number of applications. In addition to scanning for explosives, we may also assume their integration into hand-held communication systems. ‘These semiconductor devices have output powers which previously could only be obtained by molecular gas lasers occupying cubic meters and weighing more than 100kg, or free electron lasers weighing tons and occupying buildings.’ As far back as 1996 the US Air Force Scientific Advisory Board predicted that the development of electromagnetic energy sources would ‘open the door for the development of some novel capabilities that can be used in armed conflict, in terrorist/hostage situations, and in training’ and ‘new weapons that offer the opportunity of control of an adversary … can be developed around this concept’.[18]

 

The surveillance technology of today is the surveillance of the human mind and, through access to the brain and nervous system, the control of behaviour and the body’s functions. The messaging of auditory hallucinations has given way to silent techniques of influencing and implanting thoughts. The development of the terahertz technologies has illuminated the workings of the brain, facilitated the capture of emitted photons which are derived from the visual cortex which processes picture formation in the brain, and enabled the microelectronic receiver which has, in turn, been developed by growing unique semi-conductor crystals. In this way, the technology is now in place for the detection and reading of spectral ‘signatures’ of gases. All humans emit gases. Humans, like explosives, emit their own spectral signature in the form of a gas. With the reading of the brain’s electrical frequency, and of the spectral gas signature, the systems have been established for the control of populations – and with the necessary technology integrated into a cell-phone.

‘We are very optimistic about working in the terahertz electromagnetic spectrum,’ says the principal investigator of the Terahertz Microelectronics Transceiver at Sandia: ‘This is an unexplored area, and a lot of science can come out of it. We are just beginning to scratch the surface of what THz can do to improve national security’.

 

Carole Smith was born and educated in Australia, where she gained a Bachelor of Arts degree at Sydney University. She trained as a psychoanalyst in London where she has had a private practice. In recent years she has been a researcher into the invasive methods of accessing minds using technological means, and has published papers on the subject. She has written the first draft of a book entitled: “The Controlled Society”.

 

NOTES

[1] <a href="http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/antenna/neurobotics/private/121.asp" target="_blank">"">http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/antenna/neurobotics/private/1...;

At the time of writing it is still accessible. The exhibition ran from October 2006 to April 2007.

[2] Where are the scanners? Who controls them? Are they guarded by police to avoid them being stolen by terrorists? How many are they in number? Are they going into mass production? Do we have any say about their deployment? It is perhaps not unduly paranoid to want to have some answers to these questions.

[3] There is insufficient space here to deal with microchips, the covert implantation of radio transmitting devices which were referred to in Senator Glenn’s extraordinary speech to Congress on the occasion of his attempt to introduce the Human Research Subject Protection Act in 1997:

<a href="http://www.ahrp.org/InformedConsent/glennConsent.php" target="_blank">"">http://www.ahrp.org/InformedConsent/glennConsent.php</a>;

[4] Ref: The Coming Wireless revolution: When Everything Connects: The Economist: 26 April 2007.

<a href="http://www.economist.com/opinion/PrinterFriendly.cfm?story_id=9080024" target="_blank">"">http://www.economist.com/opinion/PrinterFriendly.cfm?story_id...;

[5] Guardian: ‘The Brain Scan that can read people’s intentions’: 9 February 2007. <a href="http://www.guardian.co.uk/frontpage/story/0,2009229,00.html" target="_blank">"">www.guardian.co.uk/frontpage/story/0,2009229,00.html</a>;

[6] <a href="http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/14.01/lying_pr.html" target="_blank">"">http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/14.01/lying_pr.html</a>;

[7] I say, ‘influencing’, advisedly since the technology that enables thoughts to be accessed, certainly also allows for the dulling of mental processes, the interference of memory, the excitation of mental or bodily processes, the infliction of pain on any organ or nerve, the increase of blood pressure, breathing or the slowing down of these, as well as the activation of rage, sadness, hysteria, or inappropriate behaviour. Ref:John Norseen’s work: Images of Mind: The Semiotic Alphabet. The implantation of silent messages, experienced as thoughts arising in the mind, is now possible.

[8] Despite three letters to the Guardian science correspondent, and Editor, I had no reply from them, having asked them to consider my points, as psychoanalyst and researcher, for the ethical debate which was called for. Nor was there any response from my approach to the Cambridge ethicists and scientists who were said to be forming a committee. I have seen no correspondence nor reference to the whole matter since February, 2007. There was some marked regression in the New Scientist about worms being used for experiments for remote control

See: Douglas Fox, ‘Remote Control Brains: a neuroscience revolution’, New Scientist, 18 July 2007.

[9] The covert action group in the newly formed CIA recommended to President Eisenhower in 1954 that the US must pursue “a fundamentally repugnant philosophy”, and that they must learn to “subvert, sabotage and destroy” its enemies by “more clever and more ruthless methods” than those of its opponents:

Ref: James Doolittle et al: “The Central Intelligence Agency: History and Documents (Univ.Alabama Press, 1984.

[10] Fruit flies share to a remarkable degree, the DNA of humans.
[11] Fruit Flies and You: NASA sends fruit flies into Space:

<a href="http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2004/03feb_fruitfly.htm" target="_blank">"">http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2004/03feb_fruitfly.htm<...;

[12] Ref: New Scientist, 18 July 2007: ‘Remote Control Brains: a neuroscience revolution’:

<a href="http://www.science.org.au/nova/newscientist/040ns_003.htm" target="_blank">"">http://www.science.org.au/nova/newscientist/040ns_003.htm<...;

[13] See author’s paper: <a href="http://www.btinternet.com/~psycho_social/Vol3/V3.html" target="_blank">"">http://www.btinternet.com/~psycho_social/Vol3/V3.html</a>;

[14] Nick Begich, Controlling the human mind: the technologies of political control or tools for peak performance, Earthpulse Press Publications.

[15] Liberty, and Lawyers for Liberty have staunchly maintained a thorough-going campaign against the protracted government plan to issue biometric ID cards, taking the case to the House of Lords where they have gained support. In view of the undisclosed work being carried out which will enable direct access to the brain through the technology coming to light, and using light, one cannot but suspect that the biometric ID card is but an adjunct to the tracking and data sourcing of citizens, and as such has fulfilled the function of a very effective smokescreen, having deflected the energies of the protectors of individual liberties in terms of thousands of hours of concentrated protest effort, with enormous expenditure spent on their campaign.
[16] Human subjects, once computers for research experiments program them, remain targeted, even if the original reasons for their usage have become obsolete. Some have been continuously abused for over thirty years.
[17] Thz Lasers Small Enough for Screening Devices:

<a href="http://www.photonics.com/content/" target="_blank">"">www.photonics.com/content/</a>; news/2007/February/7/86317.aspx

<a href="http://www.whatsnextnetwork.com/technology/index.php/2007/01/23/min..." target="_blank">"">http://www.whatsnextnetwork.com/technology/index.php/2007/01/...;

[18] <a href="http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/vistas/vistas.htm" target="_blank">"">http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/vistas/vistas.htm</a>;


Global Research Articles by Carole Smith

 

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It took me a few days to work up the nerve to phone William Binney. As someone already a “target” of the United States government, I found it difficult not to worry about the chain of unintended consequences I might unleash by calling Mr. Binney, a 32-year veteran of the National Security Agency turned whistle-blower. He picked up. I nervously explained I was a documentary filmmaker and wanted to speak to him. To my surprise he replied: “I’m tired of my government harassing me and violating the Constitution. Yes, I’ll talk to you.”       

A forum for short, opinionated documentaries, produced with creative latitude by independent filmmakers and artists.

Op-Ed Contributor: Giving In to the Surveillance State(August 23, 2012)

Two weeks later, driving past the headquarters of the N.S.A. in Maryland, outside Washington, Mr. Binney described details about Stellar Wind, the N.S.A.’s top-secret domestic spying program begun after 9/11, which was so controversial that it nearly caused top Justice Department officials to resign in protest, in 2004.       

“The decision must have been made in September 2001,” Mr. Binney told me and the cinematographer Kirsten Johnson. “That’s when the equipment started coming in.” In this Op-Doc, Mr. Binney explains how the program he created for foreign intelligence gathering was turned inward on this country. He resigned over this in 2001 and began speaking out publicly in the last year. He is among a group of N.S.A. whistle-blowers, including Thomas A. Drake, who have each risked everything — their freedom, livelihoods and personal relationships — to warn Americans about the dangers of N.S.A. domestic spying.       

To those who understand state surveillance as an abstraction, I will try to describe a little about how it has affected me. The United States apparently placed me on a “watch-list” in 2006 after I completed a film about the Iraq war. I have been detained at the border more than 40 times. Once, in 2011, when I was stopped at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York and asserted my First Amendment right not to answer questions about my work, the border agent replied, “If you don’t answer our questions, we’ll find our answers on your electronics.”’ As a filmmaker and journalist entrusted to protect the people who share information with me, it is becoming increasingly difficult for me to work in the United States. Although I take every effort to secure my material, I know the N.S.A. has technical abilities that are nearly impossible to defend against if you are targeted.       

The 2008 amendments to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which oversees the N.S.A. activities, are up for renewal in December. Two members of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, Senators Ron Wyden of Oregon and Mark Udall of Colorado, both Democrats, are trying to revise the amendments to insure greater privacy protections. They have been warning about “secret interpretations” of laws and backdoor “loopholes” that allow the government to collect our private communications. Thirteen senators have signed a letter expressing concern about a “loophole” in the law that permits the collection of United States data. The A.C.L.U. and other groups have also challenged the constitutionality of the law, and the Supreme Court will hear arguments in that case on Oct. 29.       

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Laura Poitras is a documentary filmmaker who has been nominated for an Academy Award and whose work was exhibited in the 2012 Whitney Biennial. She is working on a trilogy of films about post-9/11 America. This Op-Doc is adapted from a work in progress to be released in 2013.

This video is part of a series by independent filmmakers who have received grants from the BRITDOC Foundation and the Sundance Institute.

Ms. Laura, I'd say you've got it easy.  If you are being electronically tortured you will pick up the phone and beg for help from absolutely anyone.  Also, question to anyone:  when was the first account of electronic torture on us?  I know Alan Barker was I think 2001.  Mine was 2004, and beyond, into today.  After 9-11 our lives became hell, but especially after 2004.

Op-Ed: Future surveillance technology will read your  brain waves

 
By Eliot Elwar
Oct 19, 2012 in Technology
Surveillance technology evolves as mind reading from brain  recordings technology decode 'neural fingerprints,’while scientists successfully  develop technology to ‘hack’ into our brains to obtain private data.
 
From  Science Daily News: Cognitive science researchers have long been interested  in finding ways that human brains represent thoughts by illustrating the human  electrical signals complex interplay. Recent modifications in brain recording  and statistical methods have given researchers unprecedented insight into the  physical processes under-lying human thoughts. Science researchers have shown  that brain recordings can be employed to reconstruct aspects of an image or  video excerpt you are viewing, a sound you are hearing, or even the book you are  reading. This report demonstrates how far the scientific community has come to  reading your mind. Now, what is next will be doing it real time. This would be  the ultimate goal and what a tool for those in charge of a global Surveillance  System. This would allow for no hidden thoughts.
 
From CBS  Seattle News: Scientists can now “hack” into your brain with a device that’s  easily available on the open market. Researchers from the University of  California and University of Oxford in Geneva can pluck sensitive information  from your head, such as your PIN numbers and bank information. This capability  reveals how mind reading has evolved. Within a few years government authorities  will be able to determine private information about you and me by employing  these advance mind reading technologies.
 
From Kurzweilai  Accelerating Intelligence: “New research by Rice University, the University  of Houston (UH) and TIRR Memorial Hermann aims to help victims recover from  stroke to the fullest extent possible by developing and validating a noninvasive  brain-machine interface (BMI) to a robotic orthotic device that is expected to  innovate upper-limb rehabilitation.” This revolutionary new neuro-technology  will interpret brain waves to permit stroke patients to operate an exoskeleton  that wraps around their arms from their fingertips to their elbows. This  technology involves reading human brain waves, which is the key to future mind  control segment in a totalitarian surveillance society.
 
From INFOWARS:  Within 75 years people will have embedded microchips within their brain that  will allow their behavior to be controlled by government officials. These chips  will interface with global computer systems designed to regulate your personal  behavior. This new technology is probably already here. This new mind control  technology could become part of a future surveillance system worldwide. This  technology will destroy human freedom, while creating a generation of puppets.
This opinion article was  written by an independent writer. The opinions and views expressed herein are  those of the author and are not necessarily intended to reflect those of  DigitalJournal.com

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/335142?cid=dlvr.it#ixzz29ugDJxby

Former FBI Officer Ted Gunderson says they are spying on you through your TV, and "they" is government operatives

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTVB4tqzGR0

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Gunderson

The CIA is spying on you through your TV: Agency director says it will 'transform' surveillance

  • Devices connected to internet leak information
  • CIA director says these gadgets will 'transform clandestine tradecraft'
  • Spies could watch thousands via supercomputers
  • People 'bug' their own homes with web-connected devices

By ROB WAUGH

PUBLISHED: 08:20 EST, 16 March 2012 | UPDATED: 08:55 EST, 16 March 2012

When people download a film from Netflix to a flatscreen, or turn on web radio, they could be alerting unwanted watchers to exactly what they are doing and where they are.

Spies will no longer have to plant bugs in your home - the rise of 'connected' gadgets controlled by apps will mean that people 'bug' their own homes, says CIA director David Petraeus.

The CIA claims it will be able to 'read' these devices via the internet - and perhaps even via radio waves from outside the home.

Everything from remote controls to clock radios can now be controlled via apps - and chip company ARM recently unveiled low-powered, cheaper chips which will be used in everything from fridges and ovens to doorbells.

The resultant chorus of 'connected' gadgets will be able to be read like a book - and even remote-controlled, according to CIA CIA Director David Petraeus, according to a recent report by Wired's 'Danger Room' blog.

Petraeus says that web-connected gadgets will 'transform' the art of spying - allowing spies to monitor people automatically without planting bugs, breaking and entering or even donning a tuxedo to infiltrate a dinner party.

'Transformational’ is an overused word, but I do believe it properly applies to these technologies,' said Petraeus.

'Particularly to their effect on clandestine tradecraft. Items of interest will be located, identified, monitored, and remotely controlled through technologies such as radio-frequency identification, sensor networks, tiny embedded servers, and energy harvesters -  all connected to the next-generation internet using abundant, low-cost, and high-power computing.'

Petraeus was speaking to a venture capital firm about new technologies which aim to add processors and web connections to previously  'dumb' home appliances such as fridges, ovens and lighting systems.

This week, one of the world's biggest chip companies, ARM, has unveiled a new processor built to work inside 'connected' white goods.

The ARM chips are smaller, lower-powered and far cheaper than previous processors - and designed to add the internet to almost every kind of electrical appliance.

It's a concept described as the 'internet of things'.

Futurists think that one day 'connected' devices will tell the internet where they are and what they are doing at all times - and will be mapped by computers as precisely as Google Maps charts the physical landscape now.

Privacy groups such as the Electronic Frontier Foundation have warned of how information such as geolocation data can be misused - but as more and more devices connect, it's clear that opportunities for surveillance will multiply.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2115871/The-CIA-want...
 
A Sony internet TV: The rise of 'connected' devices in the home offers spies a window into people's lives - CIA director David Petraeus says the technologies will 'transform' surveillance

A Sony internet TV: The rise of 'connected' devices in the home offers spies a window into people's lives - CIA director David Petraeus says the technologies will 'transform' surveillance



Soleilmavis said:

Mind Control Overview and Head Tilting

*The supercomputers are dependent on satellite mm laser entry into left cerebellum lobe and trying to override your left cerebrum and left neocortex transmissions(right-side body controls). The Chemtrails we all see in the sky put nano-fibers and BIOAPI and ions in the atmosphere and when ingested or inhaled turn your brain cell synapses into like a circuit board. This left cerebellum laser sends the forwarding information using these BIOAPI modified synapses and granule cells to the nervous system.The lasers which enter thru the top right of skull to right cerebrum and right neocortex are the main controllers of higher thought processing and send the thought voice with various options for your control. Thought voice can also be sent thru cheekbones and TMJ area(V2K). These lasers lock you in the creative and dreamy side of the mind. While the logical and reasoning side is limited and the computer sends the artificial cognitive model(see blog for NSA Tactics for Thinking). In short, the laser to left cerebellum must be blocked by silk, vcr tape, tin foil, buttons, magnets, copper,copper screen or all. Perps usually stiffen neck on entry to prevent side to side movement. If no blockers are available, the tilting of head to the right messes up all laser entries and controls of right neocortex. By leaning head on hand or tilting head this will disrupt download. You should hear a slight pop in your left ear and you have disabled laser momentarily. The other primary key is the access to the hypothalamus which creates all likes and dislikes and therefore controlling effort and quitting points.  This is how they control your use of tv remote, buying decisions, driving decisions and work efforts. The nose must be covered and top of skull with metal, tin foil, silk or vcr tape or something to block access to this vital organ. I have effectively restricted these areas before and the perps have gone to nano laser and acupuncture points. You must then cover eyebrows and ears with something or just grow hair over these areas. Hair restricts thermal infrared imaging and access to these areas which appear cool relative to rest of body therefore making it hard to locate precise acupuncture points. For lung and stomach points I wear a leather jacket or vest or shield with an aluminum cooking sheet or copper platter. When receiving a bad thought pattern or forced anxiety just tilt your head to one side and the feed is broken.

The Surveillance Industrial Complex:
How the American Government Is Conscripting Businesses and Individuals in the Construction of a Surveillance Society

http://www.aclu.org/FilesPDFs/surveillance_report.pdf

August 2004

DARPA Can See You... From 17,500 Feet In The Air

A new video from the world's highest-resolution drone-mounted camera is mind-blowingly clear. And terrifying.

By Shaunacy Ferro
Posted 01.28.2013 at 6:03 pm34 Comments

http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2013-01/darpa-can-see-you-...
Crazy Camera PBS via YouTube

Curious as to how the Defense Department could be spying on you next? PBS checked in with DARPA about the latest in drone camera technology for the NOVA special "Rise of the Drones," including the world's highest-resolution camera.

Actually seeing the sensor on ARGUS-IS, or Autonomous Real-Time Ground Ubiquitous Surveillance Imaging System, is still classified, but the basics of how it works have been deemed fit for public consumption.

ARGUS-IS uses 368 imaging chips like those found in cell phone cameras, to stitch together a 1.8 billion pixel video. That means from 17,500 feet in the air, ARGUS-IS can see someone on the ground waving their arms. And it generates that kind of high-definition video for an area 15 square miles across. It can see a bird flying through a parking lot from more than three miles in the air.

It can store a million terabytes of video a day, up to 5,000 hours of footage, so soon drones will not only be able to see everything that happens on the ground, but also keep that record.

Whether or not ARGUS has been used in the field is still classified. Let's get real, though: Does this cool a toy get put in a corner?

February 6, 2013 | By Hanni Fakhoury

Home Video Surveillance Without a Warrant?
EFF Asks Appeals Court to Reconsider
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2013/02/eff-asks-ninth-circuit-recons...

The next time you allow a guest into your home for dinner, should you be worried they're secretly video recording every detail of your home for the government? In a new amicus brief filed in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, we've asked the court to reconsider a decision finding that allowing someone into your home means you're also placing yourself at the risk of warrantless home video surveillance.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife agents were investigating Ricky Wahchumwah for the federal crime of selling bald eagle and gold eagle feathers. An undercover agent who went to Wahchumwah's home pretending to be interested in buying feathers was secretly recording all the details of Wahchumwah's home with a small video camera hidden in his clothes. The agent did not obtain a search warrant before recording. After the trial court found no Fourth Amendment violation and refused to suppress the video, Wahchumwah was convicted and eventually appealed to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. We filed an amicus brief in support of Wahchumwah, but a three judge panel of the Ninth Circuit rejected our arguments, finding no Fourth Amendment problems. In our new amicus brief asking the entire Ninth Circuit to rehear the case, we argue the panel made two mistakes.

First, it failed to analyze the home video surveillance under the Fourth Amendment's trespass theory. Last year, the Supreme Court in United States v. Jones made clear that when the government trespasses onto private property for the purpose of obtaining information, it "searches" under the Fourth Amendment. Under common law, a defendant was not liable for trespass if the landowner authorized their entry. But that consent is ineffective if the person is mistaken about the "nature and quality" of the defendant's entry. And here Wahchumwah was clearly mistaken as to the agent's true purpose: to video record everything in his house without Wahchumwah's knowledge. Second, the court incorrectly found Wahchumwah had no reasonable expectation of privacy because he knowingly exposed the interior of his home to the agent when he let him in his house.

Both of these errors really turn on the panel's dangerous misunderstanding of people's privacy expectations. In Hoffa v. United States, the Supreme Court ruled the Fourth Amendment doesn't protect a “a wrongdoer’s misplaced belief that a person to whom he voluntarily confides his wrongdoing will not reveal it.” But at the same time, the Court has always limited searches to ensure they are reasonably related in scope to the circumstances that justify the search in the first place. When an undercover officer enters a home with the permission of the homeowner, he is obviously able to observe things with his eyes, take mental note of them and relay those opinions to other officers when he returns to the police headquarters. This is permissible because people expect visitors to observe portions of their home when they let them in. That's why people typically clean their house and put away embarrassing things before having guests over for dinner.

But people don't expect their guests to look at the letters on their desk, peer into rooms as they walk the hallways and generally rummage at will through the house. But that's precisely what the video camera here has the potential to do. A quick glance into a bedroom may not reveal much to the naked eye, but a video camera can capture it instantly and allow officers to rewind and zoom in from the comforts of their office without the homeowner wondering why their guest is lingering in the hallway. At that point, the surveillance far exceeds the circumstances that justified the search in the first place -- the homeowner's consent -- and renders the search unreasonable and unconstitutional unless the government has a search warrant.

Ultimately, in deciding whether something is exposed to another person, the key question is not whether someone can possibly discover the information but whether another might actually discover it. And with advances in technology, new and unexpected types of intrusions into otherwise private spaces are popping up every day. Obviously, technology like small video cameras should be used by law enforcement to help make us safer. But outside of extreme circumstances involving an imminent physical threat of death or serious violence to another person, law enforcement should be required to obtain judicial authorization through a search warrant before using this potentially invasive technology -- especially when investigating non-violent crimes like the illegal sale of bird feathers.

We hope the entire Ninth Circuit reconsiders it dangerous decision that truly reveals the power of technology to shrink our privacy expectations.

NSA Whistleblower: Everyone in US under virtual surveillance, all info stored, no matter the post

http://www.minds.com/blog/view/37884/nsa-whistleblower-everyone-in-...

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=e95_1359267780
1.8 gigapixel ARGUS-IS. World's highest resolution video surviellience platform by DARPA.

1 million terabytes a day saved forever.

The ARGUS array is made up of several cameras and other types of imaging systems. The output of the imaging system is used to create extremely large, 1.8GP high-resolution mosaic images and video.

The U.S. Army, along with Boeing, has developed and is preparing to deploy a new unmanned aircraft called the “Hummingbird.” It’s is a VTOL-UAS (vertical take-off and landing unmanned aerial system). Three of them are being deployed to Afghanistan for a full year to survey and spy on Afghanistan from an altitude of 20,000 feet with the ability to scan 25 square miles of ground surface.

30,000Drones over U.S. get OK by Congress
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2012/feb/7/coming-to-a-sky-near...

No American democracy for Americans?

The U.S. considers itself the most democratic country in the world. At the same time, the country is a leader when it comes to surveillance of its own citizens. If earlier more resources were required to monitor citizens, now extensive networks, high-speed computers and other modern technology significantly reduce costs.

The Mayor of New York Michael Bloomberg, commenting on the total implementation of surveillance and rumors about possible use of unmanned aerial vehicles to monitor the situation in the streets, said that the process would not stop, and the citizens must get used to it.

Every day, hundreds of thousands of surveillance cameras record faces entering the metro and various buildings, as well as license plates of passing cars. Very soon, drones with high-definition cameras may appear in the sky.

The authorities called such steps excessive security. Human rights activists protested, saying that this was an attempt of total control over the Americans, with the use of military developments.

Michael Bloomberg said that in the event of a shooting or murder, the first thing that the police ask for is footage from security cameras, as now they are installed everywhere. The Mayor stressed the need to get used to this and not be afraid. He added that people may be scared of drones, but what is the difference between a camera on a building or a drone? He said that soon face recognition technology would be implemented and the surveillance zone will be expanded. The citizens and government should only establish control over the work of these systems.

Bloomberg is confident that the installation of cameras will help the police to identify criminals (ranging from traffic offenders to murderers) and save resources. However, the exact information on the number of New York police cameras is not available in public domain.

We only know that police installed about 3,000 cameras in the streets of Manhattan. The system also includes cameras in the buildings of large companies in the downtown. There are over two thousand cameras in the subway, and the same number on the buses.

Ordinary residents installed even more cameras. Every year in New York over 100,000 surveillance cameras are sold. Residents of some areas buy equipment with their own money, and then offer law enforcement agencies to connect their cameras to the combined system.

However, not all Americans are cooperating with the authorities, and many see this as interference in their personal space and signs of a totalitarian society. A New Yorker Thomas said: “If we forget about some of the personal rights, pushing the slogans of national security, one day we can lose our freedom. Individual rights are the most important thing in life. The U.S. has been fighting terrorism for 20 years, but how many incidents the authorities failed to prevent through these surveillance systems? These systems are controlled by people who want to control the society and establish a dictatorship.”

There are numerous legal gaps in total use of surveillance cameras. Legislators should study all nuances in detail so that one day the fight against crime does not become a total surveillance of its own citizens.

The U.S. today is developing a system that allows using special cameras to identify people who are agitated and mentally unstable, as well as potential criminals. Most likely, these cameras use a slight shake of the head, limbs and body, though their work principle may be slightly different.

U.S. agency DARPA has long been studying the reasons that make the average person violent. When the mechanism of the appearance of cruelty is understood, the U.S. intelligence services will develop methods for its suppression. How exactly this will happen is not yet clear. Violence will be fought either by chemistry, or remotely by radiation.

The U.S. is also implementing a system that allows fingerprints scanning at a distance of 20 meters. This is a very convenient system that can identify a person quietly in a public place. A person walks by a camera that reads her fingerprints and runs them through the database.

In order to spy on its own citizens, the U.S. government is also using microarrays RFID that can independently identify the owner. These chips are integrated into bank cards, so every American who uses a bank card can always be identified.

It is no longer a secret that mobile communications allow the secret services to obtain the required information. U.S. intelligence agencies have recognized the fact that in certain situations they are watching their own citizens, using data from their cell phones, without the knowledge of their owners.

Americans also control social networks. Several civil law organizations have accused the U.S. company Raytheon of creating a program used for watching people on social networks. The U.S. authorities have been using it since 2010, tracking information on Twitter, Facebook and Foursquare.

The program can also view pictures of the users and identify where they were taken. Each person’s location can be followed, including the places they go and even what they eat. This information can help intelligence agencies to predict human behavior.

Cameras installed at every street corner in the United States scan license plates, and tracking the movement of any car is very easy.

The same technology that identifies the owner of the car by appearance is being tested by U.S. law enforcement agencies. The so-called “smart” lights are being installed that can take pictures of people, record video and listen to their conversations. Typically, they are installed in major U.S. cities. Moreover, the U.S. government is creating a cyber-security center to keep track of all citizens.

The center will collect and store information on nearly any person on the territory of the U.S., including phone conversations. The U.S. government intends to spend $2 billion to establish the center. The center will be located in two hangars with a powerful server that can store the volume of data that is two hundred thousand times greater than that of all human knowledge. The above technologies allow figuring out the personality of nearly any person within a few seconds.

The U.S. authorities decided to use military equipment against their people. U.S. drones Predator, originally intended for military operations and the fight against terrorism, will now track movement of civilians. According to their characteristics, these drones should be able to determine even at night whether a person is armed.

Using mobile phones frequency, these devices will be able to clearly identify the location of a person. The U.S. government has legalized the use of drones on its territory, which aroused a storm of outrage from human rights groups. “I am concerned that the UAV will be used against law-abiding firearm owners in the USA,” said Alan Gottlieb, founder of the supporters of the Second Amendment of the Constitution. “This will lead to a violation of rights under the Second and the Fourth Amendments.”

It seems that the U.S. government is not overly concerned about violation of the rights of its citizens. The important thing is control over everyone and everything. Russian Foreign Ministry in October of last year drew attention of the U.S. administration to the facts of child abuse, police violence, invasion of privacy and reduction of freedom of speech. It also questioned the democracy in the USA, which allows intelligence agencies to check all electronic communications of people located in the country without a court order. But the U.S. government does not want to see the problems and continues to violate the rights of their citizens. In the U.S., there is no anonymity, the last remnants of private life gradually dissolve in the ocean of high-tech devices. Total control of the country could lead to a simple dictatorship, slightly covered with a thin veil of democracy.

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